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Black Lives Matter at FCC (click to read more)

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Love Your Neighbor, No Exceptions

Congregation2017Welcome!

I’m Reverend Dominic Taranowski and I’d like to welcome you to the First Congregational Church in Melrose, United Church of Christ. A lot of churches say “come as you are,” but we really mean it. It doesn’t matter your age or your background or your story: you are welcome here.  We’re an intergenerational church with something for everyone: from our vibrant worship service on Sunday morning, to our Sunday school program, to our mission work, to our public advocacy presence.  We’re always about the work of faith formation and discipleship.

We strive to create a deeper relationship with God but also an outward expression of that faith in the wider world. The church provides opportunities for both of those.  You can renew and strengthen your relationship with God and also find ways to live out that faith on a daily basis. We are a casual, committed, progressive church and we welcome you here.

See you in church!


Audio and VIDEO Updates

Here’s a great way to check in:  Reverend Dominic is posting regular updates to connect with the congregation.  You can find these under the “AUDIO & VIDEO MESSAGES” tab at the top menu on any of our website pages. 


Mariko’s music recordings

Want to worship from home?  Please go to the tab “WORSHIP AND MUSIC” at the top menu to listen to recordings made by our music director, Mariko Matsumura.  You can view Videos posted on our private friends-and-members Facebook page, the Virtual Narthex of First Congregational Church in Melrose UCC.


News

Black Lives Matter at FCC

(As posted on the 9/25/2020 Messenger)

At its September meeting, the Board of Deacons of our church decided to move forward with the placement of Black Lives Matter signs at our church. 

This decision was taken not only at the urging of our wider denomination to become more publicly visible in our commitment to racial justice, but also because the Board felt it to be the faithful response to the current racial crisis in our country and community.

I realize that this may be a controversial action not only in our wider community, but within our own church as well.  Consequently, I will be addressing this decision by means of the sermon this Sunday, September 27th, and there will be follow-up information here in the Messenger from members of the Board of Deacons. 

The sign will go up immediately following the worship service this Sunday.

In the meantime, let me try to pre-emptively allay any concerns about this decision by addressing some common questions that may arise out of this action:

Question: What is “Black Lives Matter”?

Answer: Black Lives Matter (BLM) is an international activist movement, originating in the African American community, that campaigns against violence toward black people.

BLM participants have demonstrated in response to numerous deaths of black people while in police custody and in support of economic and social equality for the black community.  Many in our congregation have participated in such demonstrations.  While a movement, it is decentralized and has no formal hierarchy or structure.

Question: Why not say “All Lives Matter”?

Answer:  Of course all lives matter!  There are times, however, when it is important to lift up those in a particular group who are not experiencing this truth.  A couple of things here:

    1. The language is not “Only Black Lives Matter” nor is it “Black Lives Matter More”. It is simply that “Black Lives Matter”.  Many African Americans do not believe their lives matter equally (and there is certainly evidence to support this) so it is important to state what should be obvious: Black Lives Matter.
    1. Black people are at risk from systems in our society that devalue or endanger them far more than any other racial group such as: mass incarceration, economic inequality, housing discrimination, inequality of educational opportunity, and others. The devaluing of black lives is a legacy of slavery and Jim Crow; systems that were in place for hundreds of years in our country.

If your neighbor’s house were burning, you would not tell the fire department that all houses matter.  You would want them to direct their attention to the house in danger.  So it is with black people both in the US and globally today.  The house is on fire and we need to act!

    1. In the founding years of this nation, the same person could say “all men are created equal” and still hold some people in bondage, not seeing them as created equal.

Frances Scott Key, who wrote our National Anthem, included the words “land of the free” in that song.  He was, ironically, a slave owner. 

Because of this history “all lives matter” has too easily meant only the lives of citizens identified as white.

Question:  What about the police?  Isn’t “Black Lives Matter” a statement against the police?  What about Blue Lives?

Answer: No one is saying that the lives of police officers don’t matter.  Of course they do.  Any death of a police officer should be mourned.  Again, all lives DO matter.

There are laws, policies, and practices protecting “blue lives” that make it highly unlikely that deadly violence against the police will escape consequences.  The reverse is not true for black lives.

Black Lives Matter calls out the actions of those police officers who commit unjustified, extrajudicial violence.  It calls out the system that protects such officers from responsibility for their acts.  It calls for change in a justice system which disproportionately incarcerates people of color.  These ideals are not anti-police.  In fact, these ideals directly aligned with the mission of the police to “protect and serve” their communities.            

Question:  Why is this happening now?  Haven’t we made great strides toward equality?

Answer:  Strides toward racial justice and equality have always provoked an intense backlash. We are currently in a time of such backlash; a time when those who believe in racial justice and equality need to be visible and vocal as we stand in the public square.  

FCC places the sign “Black Lives Matter” at our church to acknowledge that none of us are free until we are all free.  My liberation is bound up in your liberation.

Again, while this may be difficult for some, the church leadership has decided that this is the right thing to do.  It may stretch us in ways that may make us uncomfortable at times.  It may call us to be courageous in ways that we are not used to.  But stretching and courage can be a very good things!  And this action is certainly in keeping with much of scripture including Paul’s admonition to the Galatians:

“Bear one another’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ.”

In Christ,

–Rev. Dominic


The sermon about Black Lives Matter from worship on September 25, 2020:


Contributions from our Deacons about Black Lives Matter:

from the 10/2/2020 Messenger:

Dear FCC Community –
 
As a church we do a very good job of supporting individuals in need through programs like Refugee Immigration Ministry and Bread of Life – this need exists due to systemic racism (https://www.raceforward.org/videos/systemic-racism). Systemic racism is the way racism shows up in our lives across institutions and society. Among other impacts, systemic racism keeps our communities segregated, causes disparities in health, and contributes to the massive wealth gap.  Looking at the wealth gap alone the numbers are staggering.  In Boston, while white households have a median net worth of $247,500, Black households have a median net worth of $8!  This summer the Board of Deacons began a conversation about how the First Congregational Church community can address and take more direct action to dismantle systemic racism. 

 
After the deaths of George Floyd at the hands of police, Ahmaud Arbery at the hands of racist citizens, and too many others to mention, we felt our church could no longer be silent.  Our faith calls us to act in the face of injustice.  The Board of Deacons had multiple conversations over the summer about how to respond. One option raised was to put up a Black Lives Matter sign, as a number of other faith communities around us have.  Among the Board there are multiple views on this.  To clarify people’s thinking, and give everyone a chance to share and discuss their views, we asked each person on the Board to share how they feel using a 5 point scale ranging from “Fully Support Putting Up A Sign” to “Opposed To Putting Up A Sign.”  We were heartened and inspired by the open conversation that followed.  In the end, the Board decided that we need to show our support for the Black Lives Matter movement by displaying a sign.
 
The Board also felt strongly that a sign was not enough – that the symbol needs to be backed with action.  As one step toward action, each Deacon is exploring how their area of ministry can play a part in dismantling the pervasive system of racial inequality.  One example of where this work has already begun is in Christian Education.  Over the summer, Laura Pollica and Jaime McAllister-Grande planned and implemented a book exchange for families that included books that uplift Black people in American history, tell the story to the Civil Right Movement and examine issues such as poverty.  Children each read two books and wrote a response that they shared with a book buddy.  One important way to take action is to educate our children about how we got here, how to talk about race and understand the privilege they hold simply by virtue of being white, and how to use their privilege to work for justice.  
 
The Board of Deacons also feels it is important that everyone in our community understand that this a statement in support of the Black community; it is not a statement against anyone –  a common misconception of the Black Live Matter movement.
 
Throughout the church year we will offer opportunities for education and participation in actions related to dismantling systemic racism.  The Black Lives Matter signs that went up on Sunday signals our commitment as a church to work for racial justice.  

Stay tuned!
Beth & Dan Hampson
Senior Deacons  


An Important Start

Jaime  McAllister-Grande, Christian Education Co-Deacon

(from the 10/16/2020 Messenger)

When I was a student at Holy Cross College in Worcester, I elected to attend a trip to Cuernavaca, Mexico sponsored by the Chaplain’s office.  The focus of the trip was on learning about how faith, politics and poverty play out in the lives of families living in this area.

As a person who valued her faith, as well as a student who was majoring in Spanish, I was excited and also nervous about the trip.  I worried about how I would feel visiting the homes and meeting the children of families who were living in poverty, coming from a very comfortable living situation at a selective college in the US.

On the trip, and still to this day, the quote printed on the back of our trip t-shirts was what provided me the guidance I needed.  From Indigenous Australian artist and activist Lilla Watson, it said:

“If you have come here to help me you are wasting your time,
but if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”

As I sat with families in Cuernavaca, hearing about their struggles and their faith in God, it was clear to me that our wellbeing was tied together.  God made each of us and loved each of us.  I support the Black Lives Matter movement for the same reason.  I know from history and reading and lived experience that I have more supports, more opportunities, and more future potential in the US because my skin is white.  Conversely, I know that the past, present and future experiences of my fellow Americans who are Black are more difficult, more painful and more dangerous than what I experience.

It is a painful legacy, and difficult to sit with.  But I believe that my faith calls me to not just sit with it, but to stand up in support.  I need to communicate clearly: The way things are right now, in housing and schools and policing and more, is not ok.  It is not ok that my life as a white person is more closely protected, and more highly valued, than yours.  I need to do better.  Not to ‘help’ you – but rather, because every life that God makes matters, and I have been part of a system that has not valued your life.  I need to do more to make sure Black Lives matter.

Putting up a sign that says Black Lives Matter is one way we as a faith community can begin to ‘stand up’ in support.  There is much more to learn, to listen to, to do; I believe this is an important signal and an important start.


from the Video Message posted on 10/23/2020 titled “Black Lives Matter”:


View each of our worship services here:

If you wish to view our worship services and are not sure how to get to a specific service, we now have them listed out, with the most recent service on top.

Please go here: https://fccmelrose.org/our-worship-and-music-ministry/, under the menu item “Worship & Music” on each page of the website.

Thank you!

Democracy at Risk

With the election looming and anxiety high, the United Church of Christ has given voice to concerns that our democracy may in genuine peril this fall.

The authoritarian tone of Mr. Trump, a concerted effort to delegitimize the results of balloting, and a lack of assurance that there will be a peaceful transfer of power all combine to raise alarms not only within religious circles but in our country at large.

Consequently, a broad swath of ecumenical leaders in the U.S., including UCC President and General Minister Rev. John Dorhaurer, have all signed the following statement which can also be viewed on our national website.  With encouragement from our national office, I have signed this statement as well.

In Christ,

–Rev. Dominic


Defending the Democratic Process:

A Faith Community Call to Awareness and Action

The freedom of religion that all Americans cherish is but one treasure passed down to us over the course of the American experiment in self-governance.  Democracy itself is another – and a foundation of our other treasured liberties.  The fact that we have learned to take it for granted makes it no less precious today.

One of the cornerstones of democracy is the assurance of a free, fair, and respected election.  Free, meaning all eligible voters are able to vote safely and without hindrance; fair, meaning all the votes are counted transparently; respected, meaning the results of the election are accepted.  Today we are coming to understand that our democratic inheritance is only secure when all of us are willing to defend these basic principles.

Accordingly, we ask faith leaders at every level to make themselves and their communities and congregations aware that democracy itself could disappear if the people’s will, as clearly expressed through the ballot, should come to be set aside by authoritarian means and antidemocratic directives.  We call on people of faith to insist that the vote of the people and the proper functioning of the Electoral College be respected by all parties to the national election.  As peacemakers ourselves, we call on other faith-grounded peacemakers to join us in upholding the principle of the peaceful transfer of power.  And we urge all who cling to the concept of Beloved Community to prepare themselves to respond to any attempts to undermine this process, including supporting and even joining those who may find it necessary to engage in nonviolent civil disobedience in the event of any unjust usurpation of state authority.

We continue to pray for and expect a peaceful and orderly electoral outcome.  But we must not and we cannot be passive witnesses to the death of democracy, should the worst occur.  We hold our American democracy to be a sacred trust, and we pledge ourselves to safeguard it with every ounce of our God-given strength and spirit.

Black Lives Matter at FCC - (As posted on the 9/25/2020 Messenger) At its September meeting, the Board of Deacons of our church decided to move forward with the placement of Black Lives… Read more "Black Lives Matter at FCC"
View each of our worship services here: - If you wish to view our worship services and are not sure how to get to a specific service, we now have them listed out, with the… Read more "View each of our worship services here:"
Democracy at Risk - With the election looming and anxiety high, the United Church of Christ has given voice to concerns that our democracy may in genuine peril this fall. The… Read more "Democracy at Risk"

Click here to see ALL of our news (present & past)

Black Lives Matter at FCC - (As posted on the 9/25/2020 Messenger) At its September meeting, the Board of Deacons of our church decided to move forward with the placement of Black Lives… Read more "Black Lives Matter at FCC"
Democracy at Risk - With the election looming and anxiety high, the United Church of Christ has given voice to concerns that our democracy may in genuine peril this fall. The… Read more "Democracy at Risk"
Return to In-Person Worship - This coming Sunday, October 18, we will begin a return to in-person worship attendance in the church sanctuary.  We will be implementing an incremental approach to this… Read more "Return to In-Person Worship"
In His Own Words - For decades, the United Church of Christ has recognized Indigenous People’s Day in place of Columbus Day.  Still, many states and communities—not to mention the federal government—still… Read more "In His Own Words"
The Humility of a Judicial Giant - Pretty much everything we take for granted, we shouldn’t. For example, here are a few laws that I think are pretty important and I take them for… Read more "The Humility of a Judicial Giant"
Are You Joining Us for Worship? - With our first live streaming worship service under our belts, we are underway with our new program year here at First Congregational Church! What did you think… Read more "Are You Joining Us for Worship?"

Click here to see ALL of Rev. Dominic’s weekly notes (present & past)

In depth review

Church blogger George Parks recently attended our congregation and had this to say: “This is a warm, active, community church, that provides space for personal growth and contemplation, as well as advocacy for the greater good of the community. Melrose and the surrounding communities are very lucky to have FCC of Melrose contributing to the greater good.”  Read his review here.

Get to Know Us

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We seek to foster the joy, love, and fellowship that are part in parcel in our Christian community. We have a great time when we’re together. Our hope is that our church will brighten lives and not subtract joy.

These are exciting days for our church as we grow in the spirit and love of Christ. We have much to celebrate at First Congregational Church. We are an Open and Affirming Congregation with a growing membership. Our youth are engaged and eager to contribute to our church missions. We have innovative and exciting ministries that involve both new and lifelong members of our church family. We have a wealth of history that reflects our members’ desire to make a difference! Please click one of the links below to find out more.

Children & Youth


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From newborns to graduating high schoolers, our church provides a dynamic programs with an active enrollment of children and youth. Taught by members of the congregation, our church school teaches the basic values and stories of our faith and encourages a questioning attitude on the part of students. The goals of the program are to help children claim the Christian faith as their own and instill in them the truth that they are valued by God and the community.

Our church has two youth groups for Middle School and High School aged youth. Recreation, service and faith development hallmark this important ministry.

Children & Youth News

Find us/Contact us

Address
First Congregational Church
United Church of Christ
121 W. Foster Street
Melrose, MA 02176
phone: (781) 665-2111 – fax: (781) 665-8824
Office email: info@fccmelrose.org
Reverend Dominic email: revdominic121@gmail.com
Click here for all staff members email addresses
Church Office Hours
Monday through Friday 8:45 am – 1:45 pm

From Route 93 South:

  • Exit 35 “Park Street/Stoneham/Melrose” (Two exits south of Rt. 128)
  • Left at the bottom of the ramp, under Route 93, right at stop sign.
  • Continue straight through set of lights at Friendly’s
  • Road becomes two lanes at Zoo, stay left.
  • Take first left after Zoo onto Pond Street. (Don’t take the Pond Street before the zoo.)
  • Continue straight through set of lights.
  • At next set of lights, turn left onto Main Street.
  • Follow Main Street to second set of lights, turn left onto West Foster Street.
  • Church is on right after stop sign.

From Route 93 North:

  • Exit 33 “Rt. 28 Stoneham/Melrose”
  • Follow Route 28 signs staying to the right. Turn right on Elm Street.
  • Continue to rotary, “turn left” by going three quarters of the way around the rotary.
  • Road becomes two lanes, stay right.
  • Take second right after Hospital onto Pond Street. (If you go past the Zoo, you’ve gone too far.)
  • Continue straight through set of lights.
  • At next set of lights, turn left onto Main Street.
  • Follow Main Street to second set of lights, turn left onto West Foster Street.
  • Church is on right after stop sign.

From Route 1 South:

  • Exit “Essex Street, Saugus/Melrose” at Walgreen’s and Dunkin Donuts.
  • Follow Essex Street over Route 1, past Square One Mall and into Melrose.
  • Essex Street becomes Upham Street in Melrose.
  • Take left at second set of lights onto Main Street.
  • At next set of lights, turn right onto West Foster Street.
  • Church is on right after stop sign.

From Route 1 North:

  • Exit “Essex Street, Saugus/Melrose” after Square One Mall and Corners.
  • Follow Essex Street, past side of Square One Mall and into Melrose.
  • Essex Street becomes Upham Street in Melrose.
  • Take left at second set of lights onto Main Street.
  • At next set of lights, turn right onto West Foster Street.
  • Church is on right after stop sign.